Apr 12, 2018

mpv audio visualization

Didn't know mpv could do that until dropping into raw mpv for music playback yesterday, while adding its json api support into emms (emacs music player).

One option in mpv that I found essential over time - especially as playback from network sources via youtube-dl (youtube, twitch and such) became more common - is --force-window=immediate (via config), so that you can just run "mpv URL" in whatever console and don't have to wait until video buffers enough for mpv window to pop-up.

This saves a few-to-dozen seconds of annoyance as otherwise you can't do anything during ytdl init and buffering phase is done, as that's when window will pop-up randomly and interrupt whatever you're doing, plus maybe get affected by stuff being typed at the moment (and close, skip, seek or get all messed-up otherwise).

It's easy to disable this unnecessary window for audio-only files via lua, but other option that came to mind when looking at that black square is to send it to aux display with some nice visualization running.

Which is not really an mpv feature, but one of the many things that ffmpeg can render with its filters, enabled via --lavfi-complex audio/video filtering option.

E.g. mpv --lavfi-complex="[aid1]asplit[ao][a]; [a]showcqt[vo]" file.mp3 will process a copy of --aid=1 audio stream (one copy goes straight to "ao" - audio output) via ffmpeg showcqt filter and send resulting visualization to "vo" (video output).

As ffmpeg is designed to allow many complex multi-layered processing pipelines, extending on that simple example can produce really fancy stuff, like any blend of images, text and procedurally-generated video streams.

Some nice examples of those can be found at ffmpeg wiki FancyFilteringExamples page.

It's much easier to build, control and tweak that stuff from lua though, e.g. to only enable such vis if there is a blank forced window without a video stream, and to split those long pipelines into more sensible chunks of parameters, for example:

local filter_bg = lavfi_filter_string{
  'firequalizer', {
    gain = "'20/log(10)*log(1.4884e8"
      .."* f/(f*f + 424.36)"
      .."* f/(f*f + 1.4884e8)"
      .."* f/sqrt(f*f + 25122.25) )'",
    accuracy = 1000,
    zero_phase = 'on' },
  'showcqt', {
    fps = 30,
    size = '960x768',
    count = 2,
    bar_g = 2,
    sono_g = 4,
    bar_v = 9,
    sono_v = 17,
    font = "'Luxi Sans,Liberation Sans,Sans|bold'",
    fontcolor = "'st(0, (midi(f)-53.5)/12);"
      .."st(1, 0.5 - 0.5 * cos(PI*ld(0))); r(1-ld(1)) + b(ld(1))'",
    tc = '0.33',
    tlength = "'st(0,0.17);"
      .."384*tc/(384/ld(0)+tc*f/(1-ld(0)))"
      .." + 384*tc/(tc*f/ld(0)+384/(1-ld(0)))'" } }
local filter_fg = lavfi_filter_string{ 'avectorscope',
  { mode='lissajous_xy', size='960x200',
    rate=30, scale='cbrt', draw='dot', zoom=1.5 } }

local overlay = lavfi_filter_string{'overlay', {format='yuv420'}}
local lavfi =
  '[aid1] asplit=3 [ao][a1][a2];'
  ..'[a1]'..filter_bg..'[v1];'
  ..'[a2]'..filter_fg..'[v2];'
  ..'[v1][v2]'..overlay..'[vo]'

mp.set_property('options/lavfi-complex', lavfi)

Much easier than writing something like this down into one line.

("lavfi_filter_string" there concatenates all passed options with comma/colon separators, as per ffmpeg syntax)

Complete lua script that I ended-up writing for this: fg.lavfi-audio-vis.lua

With some grand space-ambient electronic score, showcqt waterfall can move in super-trippy ways, very much representative of the glacial underlying audio rythms:

mpv ffmpeg visualization snapshot

(track in question is "Primordial Star Clouds" [45] from EVE Online soundtrack)

Script won't kick-in with --vo=null, --force-window not enabled, or if "vo-configured" won't be set by mpv for whatever other reason (e.g. some video output error), otherwise will be there with more pretty colors to brighten your day :)

May 19, 2014

Displaying any lm_sensors data (temperature, fan speeds, voltage, etc) in conky

Conky sure has a ton of sensor-related hw-monitoring options, but it still doesn't seem to be enough to represent even just the temperatures from this "sensors" output:

atk0110-acpi-0
Adapter: ACPI interface
Vcore Voltage:      +1.39 V  (min =  +0.80 V, max =  +1.60 V)
+3.3V Voltage:      +3.36 V  (min =  +2.97 V, max =  +3.63 V)
+5V Voltage:        +5.08 V  (min =  +4.50 V, max =  +5.50 V)
+12V Voltage:      +12.21 V  (min = +10.20 V, max = +13.80 V)
CPU Fan Speed:     2008 RPM  (min =  600 RPM, max = 7200 RPM)
Chassis Fan Speed:    0 RPM  (min =  600 RPM, max = 7200 RPM)
Power Fan Speed:      0 RPM  (min =  600 RPM, max = 7200 RPM)
CPU Temperature:    +42.0°C  (high = +60.0°C, crit = +95.0°C)
MB Temperature:     +43.0°C  (high = +45.0°C, crit = +75.0°C)

k10temp-pci-00c3
Adapter: PCI adapter
temp1:        +30.6°C  (high = +70.0°C)
                       (crit = +90.0°C, hyst = +88.0°C)

radeon-pci-0400
Adapter: PCI adapter
temp1:        +51.0°C

Given the summertime, and faulty noisy cooling fans, decided that it'd be nice to be able to have an idea about what kind of temperatures hw operates on under all sorts of routine tasks.

Conky is extensible via lua, which - among other awesome things there are - allows to code caches for expensive operations (and not just repeat them every other second) and parse output of whatever tools efficiently (i.e. without forking five extra binaries plus perl).

Output of "sensors" though not only is kinda expensive to get, but also hardly parseable, likely unstable, and tool doesn't seem to have any "machine data" option.

lm_sensors includes a libsensors, which still doesn't seem possible to call from conky-lua directly (would need some kind of ffi), but easy to write the wrapper around - i.e. this sens.c 50-liner, to dump info in a useful way:

atk0110-0-0__in0_input 1.392000
atk0110-0-0__in0_min 0.800000
atk0110-0-0__in0_max 1.600000
atk0110-0-0__in1_input 3.360000
...
atk0110-0-0__in3_max 13.800000
atk0110-0-0__fan1_input 2002.000000
atk0110-0-0__fan1_min 600.000000
atk0110-0-0__fan1_max 7200.000000
atk0110-0-0__fan2_input 0.000000
...
atk0110-0-0__fan3_max 7200.000000
atk0110-0-0__temp1_input 42.000000
atk0110-0-0__temp1_max 60.000000
atk0110-0-0__temp1_crit 95.000000
atk0110-0-0__temp2_input 43.000000
atk0110-0-0__temp2_max 45.000000
atk0110-0-0__temp2_crit 75.000000
k10temp-0-c3__temp1_input 31.500000
k10temp-0-c3__temp1_max 70.000000
k10temp-0-c3__temp1_crit 90.000000
k10temp-0-c3__temp1_crit_hyst 88.000000
radeon-0-400__temp1_input 51.000000

It's all lm_sensors seem to know about hw in a simple key-value form.

Still not keen on running that on every conky tick, hence the lua cache:

sensors = {
  values=nil,
  cmd="sens",
  ts_read_i=120, ts_read=0,
}

function conky_sens_read(name, precision)
  local ts = os.time()
  if os.difftime(ts, sensors.ts_read) > sensors.ts_read_i then
    local sh = io.popen(sensors.cmd, 'r')
    sensors.values = {}
    for p in string.gmatch(sh:read('*a'), '(%S+ %S+)\n') do
      local n = string.find(p, ' ')
      sensors.values[string.sub(p, 0, n-1)] = string.sub(p, n)
    end
    sh:close()
    sensors.ts_read = ts
  end

  if sensors.values[name] then
    local fmt = string.format('%%.%sf', precision or 0)
    return string.format(fmt, sensors.values[name])
  end
  return ''
end

Which can run the actual "sens" command every 120s, which is perfectly fine with me, since I don't consider conky to be an "early warning" system, and more of an "have an idea of what's the norm here" one.

Config-wise, it'd be just cpu temp: ${lua sens_read atk0110-0-0__temp1_input}C, or a more fancy template version with a flashing warning and hidden for missing sensors:

template3 ${color lightgrey}${if_empty ${lua sens_read \2}}${else}\
${if_match ${lua sens_read \2} > \3}${color red}\1: ${lua sens_read \2}C${blink !!!}\
${else}\1: ${color}${lua sens_read \2}C${endif}${endif}

It can then be used simply as ${template3 cpu atk0110-0-0__temp1_input 60} or ${template3 gpu radeon-0-400__temp1_input 80}, with 60 and 80 being manually-specified thresholds beyond which indicator turns red and has blinking "!!!" to get more attention.

Overall result in my case is something like this:

conky sensors display

sens.c (plus Makefile with gcc -Wall -lsensors for it) and my conky config where it's utilized can be all found in de-setup repo on github (or my git mirror, ofc).

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